Planning to travel with your spouse? Well, that’s great news! You two have finally managed to escape the mundane and actually tick off a couple of things in your bucket list. 

Traveling as a married couple creates an opportunity to take a break from responsibilities, and do what you pledged to do: to live a happy and meaningful life together. It’s a great way to create more memories, try something new, and get to know each other more deeply, all of which can strengthen your marital friendship. 

But given that you’re no longer in your young, carefree, dating stage, traveling in marriage may present its own set of challenges, which can totally ruin your seemingly fun getaway. Your limited time and budget can be an issue. You may be crankier than usual if things don’t go as planned. You may not be as adventurous and energetic as usual. Traveling can bring out your worst sides. 

If you want to make the most out of your romantic getaway, here are 8 handy tips to keep in mind. 

1. Let go of the small annoyances

Don’t sweat the small stuff. When small annoyances try to bring you down, (like your husband’s annoying habits, delays, traffic congestion, and bland food) keep reminding yourself of the significance of this entire trip: to spend quality time with your spouse. 

Learn to laugh a lot. You can even make fun of the situation to set the day off on the right track. 

2. Don’t be afraid to do something new

Make sure your next travel is not the same as the previous one. Or the travels before that. You can go to the same place and try a different activity. You can do the same activities but in a different place. If you tend to be a bit laidback, you may challenge yourselves in adventurous activities like hiking, camping, rock climbing, surfing, kayaking and other activities that involve teamwork and encouragement. 

3. Try to find something positive in getting lost

Don’t get me wrong – it’s not okay to get lost, especially when you’re in an unfamiliar place. You need to find ways to gain information – use your devices, ask locals for directions, and seek help from your family members. 

But after you two have done your part, stop stressing over the things you can’t control. You may spend the time relaxing with your spouse, talking about plans, discovering new sites, or looking for quaint eateries nearby. 

4. Let one person be “the bank”

After you both have agreed on a budget, have one person serve as the bank – someone who will carry and parcel out the cash during your trip. Be honest – pick someone who’s wiser when it comes to spending and saving. Doing so will prevent confusion and overspending. 

In the same way, the more “organized” and “mindful” partner should carry important travel documents, receipts, cards, and other essentials. 

5. Compromise

You may find yourself arguing over simple things: what to eat, where to go next, what to do. Pointing fingers at each other and answering “you decide” make the situation more confusing. Be honest with what you both want and let someone make a decision that will suit both of you. 

If you want to eat Japanese food and your partner says he’s good with anything, then don’t complicate things – go for that Japanese restaurant. 

6. Watch out for exhaustion and hunger

Tiredness, hunger, and frustration will bring the worst out of you. You may find yourselves yelling at each other, arguing over a map that’s not updated, in the middle of an unfamiliar road. Your rumbling stomachs make everything worse. 

The next time you travel, be prepared when these urges strike. Try to remain calm and remember that your partner isn’t your enemy – it should be you and your partner versus the problem. 

Keep your anger in check, and your mouth shut. Don’t forget to stock up on snacks. Eat first before opening starting a fight. 

7. Give yourself some time out

Just because you’re on a couples getaway doesn’t mean you should be together 100% all the time. It’s okay to spend a little time apart while traveling together. Walk around. Book a solo spa appointment. Visit the local marketplace on your own. Do the things you love to do. 

Who knows? Your partner may want to do the same thing. Just don’t forget to let each other know where you’re heading to. 

8. Have those special “romantic moments” 

Couples in marriages and/or long-term couple relationships are comfortable with each other – too comfortable that those expensive, candle-lit dinners with steak and wine are no longer in their agenda. The cost would go a long way when spent on groceries, right? But occasionally, try to find ways to shake things up and have special times together.

There are a lot of romantic ways to celebrate your special day on a budget. Next to going on adventures, you may organize a special dinner, movie night out, spa sessions, romantic beach strolls, and even reward yourselves with a deluxe accommodation. Don’t forget the candles and flowers for a more romantic date night.

Author Bio: Carmina Natividad is one of the writers for Relationship Room Couples Counseling, a couples psychology institution specializing in relationship counseling and therapies for couples and families. She may be hopeless romantic but she’s got some straightforward pieces of advice about love, dating, and relationships.

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